Today I’ll be documenting my day in comics using the Paper app on my iPad for Hourly Comic Day.

Today I’ll be documenting my day in comics using the Paper app on my iPad for Hourly Comic Day.

New #nails thanks to @thebeautydept! #hotdogs

New #nails thanks to @thebeautydept! #hotdogs

Tags: nails hotdogs

Anonymous said: Hey :) I absolutely love your comic and I'm a feminist so there's that :) I do think that our own exposure has alot to do with it, the vast majority of feminists I've seen that are modern are inter sectional and don't get caught up on 'what' women do, but are happy that they have a choice :) I totally get you. I just don't like this kind of addressing a problem with a movement with trying to shut the whole movement down, which is not exactly what you're doing but could influence :)

To me that’s like saying Chris Rock is guilty of giving ammo to the Klu Klux Klan for making generalizations about blacks in his jokes that aren’t flattering or positive. Jokes about culture typically come in the form of generalization. I shouldn’t have to say “Disclaimer: Ah, well, some people are like this, guys, but not all!” and I have no obligation to censor myself to protect the current feminist movement from criticism. Or a massive global takedown, apparently.
 
I don’t think the movement is in any danger. Considering how up in arms Women’s Studies majors get over me “crippling” myself with long nails or heels (low self-esteem, obv), I can only imagine how pissed and loud they’d be if someone tried to shut the movement down.
Deep thoughts from my 6th grade diary.

Deep thoughts from my 6th grade diary.

I’m already getting a lot of questions and “corrections” over my use of the term “third-wave feminism” in my last comic. (Am I going to have to do a disclaimer for every post?) Let me explain. Third-wave feminism did start out as a positive movement in the 90s, but I think its definition has changed. Now it’s a movement still masquerading as “the freedom to choose anything,” but with a catch. Like I said in the comic, it’s become “The choice to choose the ‘correct’ choice.” Let’s stop pretending modern feminism still supports every woman. 

At the start of the “third-wave” 20 years ago, politics were trendy and feminism was accessible to anyone. Think about the first season of “The Real World”: the 1992 cast talked about politics and attended multiple rallies, including a pro-choice rally. These days, support for Obama is the closest young Americans as a whole get to being “political.” Today the feminist movement is saturated with aggressive, college-educated white women obsessed with policing the choices of other women. Even the current feminist heroes are women like Tina Fey, who is very vocal about her disdain for strippers, women with tattoos, and anything she thinks “we should all be better than.” 

Read More

I now have an Instagram. That’s still cool, right? My name is alexdaldal. Follow me if you’d like. ლ(́◉◞౪◟◉‵ლ)

Tags: instagram

I’m back! Had a very busy November and December working, visiting family, and caring for my very sick cat (he’s good now). More comics to come in 2013, and I’ll be answering everything in my inboxes this week. Thank you guys for giving such lovely feedback and support in the past year. I really appreciate all of you!

sludgey-wudgey said: do you use illustrator or photoshop to edit your drawings? do you draw them traditionally and scan them in or do you just digitally do it? just curiouz.

I draw everything traditionally with pencil or pen on bristol paper or vellum, scan, and color in Photoshop. I do a fair amount of digital editing on my line art, though.

I don’t sketch in pencil under my ink so I have a lot of stray ink lines to erase. I mess with my lettering and realign it so it’s straighter and redraw some of the faces and expressions. The Photoshop dry media brushes are my friends.

Here’s what the raw drawings look like:

I’m shaking my head at the amount of (white) people responding to my most recent comic with “I don’t think this really happens now,” “This is probably exaggerated,” “No one says stuff like this to someone’s face,” “Those are innocent questions,” and my favorite: “Actually, minorities are pretty much more privileged than whites at this point because they are given so many opportunities!” I guess these are the same people that claim our society is post-racism because they don’t know anyone who’s racist.

The thing about the questions being asked on the right side of the comic is: those people really don’t think they’re being racist or inappropriate. When people approach a person of color and ask, “Are you the first person in your family to go to college?” they genuinely believe this is a positive assumption. Usually this is followed by “Your parents must be so proud!” before you can even respond. They think they’re giving you the opportunity to beam and trot out your inspirational horror story of clawing your way out of the hood and avoiding teen pregnancy and gangs while simultaneously helping your single mother raise your 5 younger siblings. There’s nothing wrong with that story, or being the first person in your family to go to college, but the negative assumption is and it’s hurtful. I mean, all black and latina women are proudly uneducated welfare queens pumping out children to various fathers, right? These questions will come from the mouths of people who think they’re progressive and unprejudiced, but you can bet they’re not asking whites the same things, hence the left side of the comic.

Read More